Dezheng Huo

Associate Professor, Epidemiology

Dezheng Huo

Associate Professor, Epidemiology
dhuo@health.bsd.uchicago.edu

Biography

Dezheng Huo
Associate Professor, Epidemiology
University of Chicago
Email:dhuo@health.bsd.uchicago.edu

Dr. Huo’s research interests focus on the genetic, molecular, and environmental factors underlying etiology, prognosis, and treatment of cancers, particularly as they relate to cancer in underserved populations. His research spans across several areas of cancer epidemiology and clinical epidemiology, including: Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer, particular in women of African ancestry, environmental and lifestyle factors for breast cancer etiology in African women and risk prediction model building,  and investigation of the utilization and effectiveness of cancer treatment in real world using big data.

Title of the talk: Inheritable Breast Cancer in Nigeria, Uganda, and Cameroon

Dezheng Huo, Babatunde Adedokun, Yonglan Zheng, Temidayo O. Ogundiran, Oladosu A. Ojengbede, Paul Ndom, Timothy Makumbi, Antony Gakwaya, Olufunmilayo I. Olopade

Abstract:

Background: Breast cancer among indigenous Africans is characterized by higher prevalence of triple-negative disease, advanced stage, and poor prognosis. It is unclear what are the the contribution of inherited predisposition to breast cancer in this population.

Methods. We conducted a case-control study in Nigeria, Uganda, and Cameroon to investigate the genetic and non-genetic risk factors for breast cancer. Breast cancer cases were enrolled in three tertiary hospitals, unselected for age at diagnosis and family history. Controls were breast cancer-free women of the same ages and communities/hospitals as the patients. Multi-gene panel sequencing were conducted to test germline mutations in cases and controls.

Results. Participants were 1332 breast cancer patients and 1182 controls. Mean age at diagnosis or interview is around 47 years. In Nigeria cases, 14•5% carried a pathogenic mutation in a breast cancer gene: 7•0% in BRCA1, 4•1% in BRCA2, 1•0% in PALB2, 0•4% in TP53, and 2•0% in any of 11 other genes. These finding were confirmed in patients from Uganda and Cameroon: 15.8% of cases carried a pathogenic mutation in a breast cancer gene, including 5.6% in BRCA1, 5.6% in BRCA2, 1.5% in ATM, 1.0% in PALB2, 0.5% in BARD1, 0.5% in CDH1, and 0.5% in TP53.

Conclusion. In the three countries, about 1 in 8 cases of invasive breast cancer are due to inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, or TP53. Given the high burden of inherited breast cancer, genetic risk assessment should be integrated into cancer control