Eric D. Green

Director National Human Genome Research Institute

Eric D. Green

Director National Human Genome Research Institute
egreen@nhgri.nih.gov

Biography

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D.
Director, National Human Genome Research Institute
U.S. National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Maryland, USA

Email:egreen@nhgri.nih.gov

Eric D. Green, M.D., Ph.D. is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a position he has held since late 2009. He has been at NHGRI for over 24 years. While directing an independent research program for almost two decades, Dr. Green was at the forefront of efforts to map, sequence, and understand eukaryotic genomes. His work included significant, start-to-finish involvement in the Human Genome Project.

As Director of NHGRI, Dr. Green is responsible for providing overall leadership of the Institute’s research portfolio and other initiatives. In recent years, this has included designing and launching a number of major programs to accelerate the application of genomics to medical care. Beyond NHGRI-specific programs, Dr. Green has also played an instrumental leadership role in the development of several high-profile efforts relevant to genomics, including the Smithsonian-NHGRI exhibition Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code, the NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) program, the NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy, the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Data Commons.

Title of the talk:The Human Genome Project Was Just the Beginning: Research Opportunities and Priorities at ‘The Forefront of Genomics’

Catalyzed by the successful completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003, the last ~15 years have brought spectacular advances in genomics that dramatically empower the study of human biology and disease. The human genomics enterprise is now in the midst of an important transition, as the growing foundation of genomic knowledge is being used by researchers and clinicians to tackle increasingly complex problems in biomedicine. Revolutionary new DNA sequencing technologies now allow the routine generation of prodigious amounts of DNA sequence data, which are being used to gain new insights into genome structure, function, and evolution as well as the genomic bases of rare and common diseases. Meanwhile, effective clinical applications of genomics are now emerging. These advances are helping efforts to create a ‘2020 vision’ for human genomics and precision medicine.