Guida Landouré

Assistant Professor at the University of Science, Technique and Technology of Bamako

Guida Landouré

Assistant Professor at the University of Science, Technique and Technology of Bamako
glandoure@gmail.com

Biography

Dr. Guida Landouré
Assistant Professor at the University of Science, Technique and Technology(USTTB)
Bamako, Mali

Email: glandoure@gmail.com

Dr. Guida Landouré is an Assistant Professor at the University of Science, Technique and Technology of Bamako (USTTB), Mali where he did his medical training before joining the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as visiting fellow from 2004 to 2007. He has a PhD from the University College London, London, UK. Dr. Landouré is the head of the Laboratory Neurogenetics at the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry of Bamako (USTTB), Mali working on hereditary neurological disorders including peripheral neuropathies, ataxia, myopathy and spastic paraplegia. His work has led to the characterization of new clinical entities, and the discovery and characterization of the gene for several neurological diseases. His interest goes beyond the field of neurology, and he is collaborating with other researchers on the genetics of non-syndromic hearing loss in the African population and other genetic disorders.

Title of talk: Genetics of rare diseases: bringing Africa to light

Despite Africa’s highly diverse population, genetic studies have been scarce in the continent. Therefore, many genetic diseases described in other populations have been reported to be rare in Africa. The increasing access to genetic analysis in addition to the growing funding of genetic research projects in the continent will certainly uncover many previously identified variants but also novel genes. In the era of globalization, Africa should not set aside and data from that part of the world are needed to complete or improve our understanding of the function of genes or the mechanism of disease-causing genes in order to develop assays for future therapeutics.
We present here a summary of findings in an African population confirming its diversity by identifying new variants in previously described genes and potential novel genes.
With more genetic data coming from African populations, Africa will play an important role in the understanding of genetic diseases and drug development by participating in clinical trials.