Monica Uddin

Epigenomics of traumatic stress in human populations

Monica Uddin

Epigenomics of traumatic stress in human populations
muddin@illinois.edu

Biography

Monica Uddin
Professor in the Department of Global Health at the University of South Florida College of Public Health
Email:muddin@illinois.edu

Monica Uddin is a Professor in the Department of Global Health at the University of South Florida College of Public Health, where she is an active contributor to USF’s newly established Genomics Program. Work in the Uddin research group focuses on characterizing the molecular underpinnings of stress-related mental disorders, with a particular emphasis on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  We seek to identify genetic, epigenetic, and other biologic signatures associated with risk for, and resilience to, mental illness using samples drawn from both clinical and community-based settings, with the ultimate goal of helping to inform interventions that will reduce the burden of mental illness.

Title of the talk: Epigenomics of traumatic stress in human populations

Abstract
Exposure to trauma is unfortunately quite common, with over 70% of adults reporting an experience of trauma globally. Despite the high prevalence of traumatic event exposure, the biological impact of such events remains poorly understood. Epigenetic mechanisms have gained prominence as potential indicators of traumatic stress, in part because of their ability to change in response to externally experienced events, including stressful and traumatic exposures. In this presentation, I will provide an overview of recent developments in epigenetic and epigenomic studies of trauma and its related sequela, post-traumatic stress disorder, in human populations. Examples will be drawn from diverse populations, including U.S. military and community-based studies, as well as work conducted in African contexts.