Paulina Tindana

Senior Lecturer and Bioethicist at the University of Ghana School of Public Health

Paulina Tindana

Senior Lecturer and Bioethicist at the University of Ghana School of Public Health
paulina.tindana@navrongo-hrc.org

Biography

Dr Paulina Tindana
Senior Lecturer and Bioethicist at the University of Ghana School of Public Health
University of Ghana,
Legon, Ghana

Dr Paulina Tindana is a Senior Lecturer and Bioethicist at the University of Ghana School of Public Health. Until recently, she was a Deputy Chief Health Research Officer at the Navrongo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service in northern Ghana. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Ghana in 1999, Master of Health Sciences (Bioethics) degree from the University of Toronto, Canada in 2004 and a DPhil at the Department of Public Health, University of Oxford, UK in 2013.

Her main teaching and research focus is on the ethical, social and cultural implications of international collaborative research, particularly the practical ethical issues arising in genetic/genomic research, informed consent, ethics review, community engagement strategies in global health research and health systems research ethics. She has extensive experiences in conducting qualitative studies and has published widely in peer reviewed journals. She is a member of the Plasmodium Diversity Network (PDNA) and DELGEME.

Title of the talk: Taking Community Engagement Seriously in Genomics research in Africa

Genomics research raises important ethical issues including those related to how relevant communities can meaningfully be engaged in the research process. While there is growing recognition of both the intrinsic and instrumental values of community engagement in the successful implementation of genomics studies in Africa, questions remain about how to build the evidence base to support community engagement. Drawing on experiences from the H3Africa Consortium including recent community feedback sessions in Northern Ghana, this presentation will make a case for why and how community engagement ought to be taken seriously when conducting genomics studies in Africa. Emphasis will be placed on community engagement as a process that needs to be carried out throughout the course of a project including sharing of research results.